The Tuttle Twins Freedom Blog

How Does Homeschooling Work?

A couple of weeks ago, I came across an awesome tweet that I tucked away so that I’d remember to write about it when I had a moment. It summarized this recent national survey which found that 52% of parents in the age of COVID-19 have developed a more favorable view of homeschool. RED ALERT! (If you’re establishment, that is…) Now, I know a lot of you are getting ready to hit “reply” to remind me that what formerly public school families are experiencing right now is not homeschool. I agree. Which actually makes this survey even more encouraging! When you homeschool your children (did you know that nearly two million American children are homeschooled?! Pre-COVID-19, that is…) you are typically responsible for choosing what curriculum—if any—you are going to use. You decide the best setting in which to “do school”—at the beach, at the lake, in a homeschool room

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The Tuttle Twins Guide to Current Events

Happy Friday! The other day I got an email from a YouTuber named Karen Rodriguez whose page, “Our House,” had just put out a great video about how the messages in our books correlate to current events. I’d encourage you to go over and take a look at it when you get a moment—she did a great job! Karen chose to focus on The Tuttle Twins and the Road to Surfdom and how the lessons of central planning, unintended (and intended) consequences, and individualism vs. collectivism affect people’s daily lives and relate to what we are seeing play out on the world stage right now. I’ve already talked a lot about how The Tuttle Twins and the Messed Up Market applies to current events—what with bailouts and stimulus, and the failure of so many people to recognize that individual human action is what creates an economy—but after watching Karen’s video,

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The Myth of Non-Essential Jobs and Activities

The other day I saw a post on Instagram where a woman listed out COVID-19 era terms that she and her family were choosing not to use. As has always been the case in “unprecedented” times, a new vocabulary often emerges—heavily influenced by news pundits, government agencies, and social media. After 9/11,  words and phrases entered into our everyday that many of us had never before spoken or written. Jihad, war on terror, sleeper cell, ground zero, Taliban, Patriot Act… the list is long and memorable. So of course with a worldwide pandemic and massive shutdowns of life across the world, we are going to see new words and phrases rise to common use. A couple of weeks ago, I wrote about why it’s important to be careful what we accept as a “new normal” (a phrase which saw an uptick in use after 9/11 as well) because of the

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Why Less Government, Not More, is the Key to Recovery

Greetings from another day of lockdown! Is your state beginning to open up or make plans for opening? I read an article last night that I thought I’d mention. It’s about deregulation in the face of COVID-19 and why governments are being forced to admit that their heavy-handed policies cause harm. Most of us already know this is true. I’ve written books about it. F.A. Hayek wrote books about it. Murray Rothbard wrote books about it. Concerned economists and freedom-lovers have been writing and talking about it ‘til they are blue in the face for centuries. And yet here we are again—in mid-2020, still talking about it. Sometimes, there are events or times in human history where concerned citizens awake to a common realization and vow to never let “that” happen again. My hope is that we could be entering just such a time. I’m encouraged when I see people

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Things Worth Observing

Happy Monday! Let’s take a break from all the gloom and doom, shall we? One of our readers—a follower on Instagram—posted this on her page: There is a lot going on in our world right now. Our children can feel the shifts, they overhear our conversations, and now they can also see physical differences. All of that can feel a little scary for them, just like it is for us. But knowledge is power and right now, it can also be comfort. This is why we have a new addition to our weekly rhythm that our kiddos LOVE! Tuttle Twins Tuesday! The Tuttle Twins books are such a fun way to introduce and start discussions about big topics like government, rights, the economy, education, and so much more. This is reading like an ad, but we just love them! I know other families like ours will find them helpful right

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Hiding from Hobgoblins

I shared some thoughts on my Facebook page the other day that I think are worth repeating here, so bear with me if you already saw this.  😉 Ben Franklin was spot on when he said: “Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.” These words are often misquoted so let’s break it down quick: He was talking about essential liberty—enduring principles, due process, and fundamental rights. And the issue isn’t long-term safety and stability—where one might concede to some basic regulations of one’s rights—but rather an exchange of liberty in return for “a little temporary” safety. It’s expediency—a surrendering of something enduring, traded for (supposed) safety in the short-term due to a perceived threat. So basically, we freak out in response to something, and then support the strong-arm tactics laid out as The Way to Fix The Problem. We

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