Email Newsletter Archive

The Tale of the Government-Caused Cobra Infestation

Ever heard about the time the government caused an infestation of black-market cobras? (Bonus: it’s a lesson opportunity to teach free-market economics!) It all started back when India was under British rule. Largely comprised of uninhabited jungle, the country happened to contain a large population of cobras. I don’t know if you’ve ever encountered one, but cobras are pretty scary. They’re huge, they have menacing black hoods that spread when threatened, and their venom is notoriously deadly. (According to the internet, anyway. Fortunately, I’ve never had to encounter one myself…) In the wild, they weren’t too much of a problem, so long as people kept their distance. But as trade and opportunity increased, Indian cities expanded into formerly wild spaces — as with the city of Delhi — and the cobras posed an increasing problem in residents’ daily lives. So, the British decided to declare war on the snakes. The

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On Global Taxes and Leviathan Crises

Have you ever heard of the Group of Twenty? You might know it better by its nickname, the G20. It’s a conference of government bank ministers and officials from the 19 richest countries in the world, plus the European Union. Members meet each year to discuss policy, strategize, and, in theory, work to make their countries stronger, more prosperous places. But if you’ve read The Creature From Jekyll Island, you know that when you put all the people who control our money in one room, it doesn’t always end well for the rest of us. Well, this week, the G20 is meeting. And according to some news reports that went mostly under the radar, these folks are cooking up a plan to tax everyone even more. Yes, everyone. We’re talking the entire world. No joke. This plan to set a “minimum corporate tax” rate of 21% was pitched this week

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Presidents, Pandemics, and the Road to Surfdom

It’s no secret that Presidents love to use and abuse executive power. They use it to skirt the legislative process, appeal to voters, and get what they want out of their presidency. Since taking office 75 days ago, President Biden has signed 37 executive orders. Many of those were signed in the first week, regarding issues like the climate and racial justice. President Trump signed 220 executive orders during his time in the White House. President Obama signed 276. The list goes on and on. Leaders of both political parties tend to cry “overreach” when it’s not their pick in the White House… then conveniently forget about that whole concept once someone from their own team takes the reins. But why is overreach a bad thing? For starters, this country’s founders were pretty clear that they didn’t want any one guy with all of the government power — even one

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The Tuttle Twins Come Around to Socialism

I imagine that subject line comes as a surprise, but hear me out. After seeing how awesome socialism has worked for other countries throughout history, future books we publish will have the Tuttle Twinsbecome Marxists. Emily and Ethan will abandon their love of freedom, and aspire to join the“Squad” in their adventures to mobilize America’s “woke” mob. No more capitalist success stories. No more praising the “free market” and its “solutions.” No more personal liberty. It’s time to let the government take control. After all, politicians are better at making decisions than regular people… Ahem. Did I get ya? (Nah, you’re smarter than that…) Chances are, that gag only worked on you if you forgot it’s April Fool’s Day. Or maybe you just thought I was crazy! In any case, I’m not sure exactly why this “holiday” exists, but since it’s all about getting duped and looking silly, it’s a

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The “Vaccine Passport” Trojan Horse

This week, it was reported that the Biden Administration is developing a “Vaccine Passport.” News outlets claim this will come in the form of a scannable barcode showing proof of a vaccination or recent negative test. It could be used to enter planes, restaurants, concerts, sporting events, and the workplace. If you weren’t born with a deep skepticism of the government, this might seem like a decent idea. You prove you got the vaccine, you get a passport, you go back to normal life! Hooray!  Except, it’s not really that simple. Or innocuous. Famed economist Frederic Bastiat implored us in The Law, his hallmark essay, to “peer past the obvious.” In this case, we’re not talking about a piece of paper that shows if you’ve taken the vaccine or not. That already exists. This is an entirely new system that’s being built to track your health data and surveil your

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The Magical World of “Wage Gap” Myths

In America, you can sue people for a lot of reasons. But you can’t sue the law of supply and demand. At least, not effectively. Of course, silly old facts aren’t known for getting in the way of compelling cultural narratives. Enter soccer star Megan Rapinoe, who announced at the White House this week that she is suing her employer, the US Women’s National Soccer Team, for “equal pay.” She told the world she had been “disrespected and dismissed” because she is a woman. Given the response this statement received online, I imagine many people heard this and thought, “Oh no! Why wouldn’t we pay women equally? Good for her.” To be fair, the idea sounds nice. The US Women’s team is successful. They win lots of championships. They’re great athletes. The reality, though, is that the intersection of the supply of your skills and the demand for your skills

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